coping mechanisms for two broken wrists?

| 4 Comments

So, it's starting to sink in for Lane just how helpless the two casts are going to make him, and that's really tough for him. Any practical suggestions from my readership as to how to help him be as self-sufficient as possible, even with one incapacitated arm and one that has a cast from below the elbow beyond the wrist?

4 Comments

clothes:
muscle shirts, nba uniform tops, pants/shorts with one drawstring few, if any, buttons and zippers. flipflops and sandles.

food:
big spoon, cups with lids and handles (like a travel coffee cup)

bathing:
can't get casts wet usually, so... you need plastic bags for the shower... for the arm with the forearm cast... a long waterproof cleaning glove will work, for the other... a long breadbag or something similar.

itching... abrade the edge of a wire covered coat hanger so it is a little rough and voila, it will go and resolve all sub-cast itches.

Next time a cast is replaced demand a Gor-tex cast. Those can get wet. It may cost a little more but is worth every penny. My brother broke his wrist before spending a summer as boatswain on a sailboat, the Gor-tex cast made it possible.

The folks at Greater Rochester Orthopedics http://www.gro-md.com/ offered it to us as an alternative for him a few years back. He broke his arms/wrist/fingers more than we could count.

Oh Liz, I'm so sorry to hear about Lane's accident. I have had two broken wrists though not at the same time! I agree with comments above and would add:
1. Do every possible hand strengthening exercise you can, Lane, during the time you are in a cast - especially with the hand that has the shorter cast. I used two balls of silly putty mashed together (one would work at the beginning) and stored them in ziplock bag. Physical therapists also have tubs of special putty for this purpose. Get some before cast is off and work squeezing. Very important as you will lose strength in your hand that is hard to regain! I will save my other strengthening exercise for when cast is off.
2. I found small garbage can bags worked for showers and I tied them on with ribbon (I tried rubber bands but too tight). It is tough with the two hands incapacitated. I had to give up certain things like washing my own hair, wearing certain clothes (which won't be a problem for Lane unless he likes panty hose or tights!)
3. Start writing with whichever hand lets you write easiest and draw or write all the time.
4. Clothes with no zippers or buttons - a challenge, I know - especially if you want to look cool! On the other hand people will be thrilled to decorate your cast so make sure you have cool color markers available in a pouch around your neck! You can also have your Mom (in her spare time) make you cool "cast socks" out of different cool fabrics so you can change your look!
5. I think the coat hanger trick is more dangerous as an anti-itch tool than a nice knitting needle. Find one with a rounded tip. There are plastic (nylon) ones and bamboo ones.
6. Start thinking of an avatar you can create that has these same issues and think about what the avatar can do creatively to work around the limitations!
7. Don't give up or get discouraged - six weeks will go by faster than you think and you will be getting the cast off the one arm. Don't freak out when you see all the dried up dead skin - washes off, etc.
Good luck!

Oh Liz, I'm so sorry to hear about Lane's accident. I have had two broken wrists though not at the same time! I agree with comments above and would add:
1. Do every possible hand strengthening exercise you can, Lane, during the time you are in a cast - especially with the hand that has the shorter cast. I used two balls of silly putty mashed together (one would work at the beginning) and stored them in ziplock bag. Physical therapists also have tubs of special putty for this purpose. Get some before cast is off and work squeezing. Very important as you will lose strength in your hand that is hard to regain! I will save my other strengthening exercise for when cast is off.
2. I found small garbage can bags worked for showers and I tied them on with ribbon (I tried rubber bands but too tight). It is tough with the two hands incapacitated. I had to give up certain things like washing my own hair, wearing certain clothes (which won't be a problem for Lane unless he likes panty hose or tights!)
3. Start writing with whichever hand lets you write easiest and draw or write all the time.
4. Clothes with no zippers or buttons - a challenge, I know - especially if you want to look cool! On the other hand people will be thrilled to decorate your cast so make sure you have cool color markers available in a pouch around your neck! You can also have your Mom (in her spare time) make you cool "cast socks" out of different cool fabrics so you can change your look!
5. I think the coat hanger trick is more dangerous as an anti-itch tool than a nice knitting needle. Find one with a rounded tip. There are plastic (nylon) ones and bamboo ones.
6. Start thinking of an avatar you can create that has these same issues and think about what the avatar can do creatively to work around the limitations!
7. Don't give up or get discouraged - six weeks will go by faster than you think and you will be getting the cast off the one arm. Don't freak out when you see all the dried up dead skin - washes off, etc.
Good luck!

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This page contains a single entry by Liz Lawley published on August 14, 2007 12:31 AM.

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